How marketing helped to increase Clinton’s revenue by 30%

 

 

Clinton Griffiths is a physio. He is also a small business owner. He runs his own physio practice in Southern Sydney in a suburb called Cronulla.

He runs a fabulous practice with a great team, and one of the most amazing things he has achieved as a business owner is the relaxed and friendly culture that he has built.

This culture runs strongly throughout every touchpoint of the business; including his team, and the overall vibe within the practice itself. A great team and a great level of service has meant that Clinton has always experienced a really healthy and steady flow of word-of-mouth referrals. 

However, while Clinton thought this was great – he wanted to be a bit more in charge of his own destiny when it came to marketing.

Word-of-mouth referrals are always fantastic, however he knew he needed more than that to grow his business further. He knew that there were still plenty of people outside those that were being referred that could potentially be perfect clients for his clinic. 

Plus, he was always just a little bit nervous about what would happen if the word of mouth referrals dried up? He just didn’t really feel that he had as much control over that form of marketing that he would like to have.

So, in June last year, Clinton jumped on board with our How to do Marketing Academy. Since then he’s grown his revenue by 30% using a marketing system that allows him to have much more control over his own destiny than simply relying on word of mouth.

Listen to this episode to find out exactly how he has achieved this. 

If you would like to find out more about Clinton or his business; Beachside Physiotherapy, you can find him here:

Website: https://www.beachside-physio.com.au/ 

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/beachsidephysiocronulla

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Episode Transcript

Jane:

Hi Clinton, and welcome to the How to do Marketing Show.

Clinton:

Hi Jane. Thanks so much for having me.

Jane:

Absolute pleasure. Now we're going to get stuck into the conversation around marketing and in particular, your marketing and your experience with marketing. But before we do that, can you please tell our listeners a little bit about yourself and your business, Beach Side Physio?

Clinton:

Yeah, sure. Jane. So I'm the director of Beach Side Physio Therapy and Sports Clinic. We're in Cronulla, which is just south of Sydney, close to the beaches, the business name suggests and it's a, yeah, it really is a beautiful place to live. Where the longest standing physiotherapy clinic in Cronulla, we started way back in 92, 93. And that's something that I'm quite proud of. And in terms of what we do Jane is, we help people overcome pain and injury so they can spend quality time with family and friends without the burden of pain. And in terms of size, we have we have four full-time physios. We have an exercise physiologist, a full-time practice manager and four admin team as well. And that's something I'm super proud of Jane, is our team. They go above and beyond for me personally. And they do the same for our clients and it certainly makes my job a hell of a lot easier. And I really enjoy working with them on a daily basis.

Jane:

Yeah. Awesome. And I know any conversations that we've had about your business, you often mentioned your team and the culture and the vibe and it's actually one of the things that kind of ends up standing you're part a bit, isn't it?

Clinton:

Yeah, absolutely. We get comments around the vibe all the time which is awesome.

Jane:

Yeah. And that's a nice big team. So did you start the business yourself?

Clinton:

No. In 92 I was 10 years old.

Jane:

My math isn't great, but I'm thinking that's a little bit too young.

Clinton:

Yeah, no, I came into the business 10 years ago. So yeah, it started well before my time.

Jane:

And what made you want to run a business or buy a business? So you bought into the business as a partner, did you?

Clinton:

Correct. I never actually wanted to start a business. I just came out of uni as a new grad and kind of just fell into it. I was working at Beachside as a grad and seeing my 60, 70 patients a week working six days a week. And one of the directors wanted to sell out. She wanted to sell her share. So I thought, how hard could that be?

Jane:

As we all do.

Clinton:

What a steep learning curve that was. I was just thrown totally in the deep end. I was seeing my 60, 70 patients a week doing six days work a week and now it's running the business as well. And having to do all those extra tasks that a business owner has to do. It was a super busy period Jane, and not only that, I was still learning my craft. I was still learning how to be a physio and now I had to run a business also. And yeah, during that period, I got married to my beautiful wife Pru and we had three kids Jack, Sophie and Olivia as well and bought a home. So it was a super busy period for us, a bit of a roller coaster ride, but definitely a period that I'm quite grateful for. And I certainly learned a lot about myself during that time. And then I purchased the other share of their business, the other 50% of the business more recently. So now I am the sole director and yeah, the business is in a great position and I'm quite excited about the future.

Jane:

Wow. That's awesome. So when you bought into the business, you had another business partner and, and you spoke about kind of getting your head around the business side of the look. Honestly, I think so many of us would not start a business if we knew then what we know now, so many of us would have gone off. I don't know about that actually. No, that all sounds a bit too hard, but you go in with your eyes open thinking, well, it should be right. What is it paying a few invoices and managing a few people it'll be fine. I have two questions, one was your partner able to kind of mentor you or provide you with a bit of guidance? Like they'd obviously been in the business for a while, was that helpful?

Clinton:

No they didn’t help, and that was fine. They didn't help clinically and didn't help from a business perspective. So I sort of did it all myself which was totally fine. They had just run the business, the old school way, just well in physiotherapy anyway, just turn up. See your patients and get out of there and let admin sort the rest out. No marketing, no nothing. Yeah, so it was a massive learning curve for me that's for sure.

Jane:

Yeah. And particularly when you're still learning your craft, as well as you say, I think that's such a valid point when you're actually trying to become an expert in your field, as well as get your head around the business side of things. That's a massive task. So in terms of the business side of things, what was probably your steepest learning curve? Like where was it? Cause you've obviously got people management. I mean, you've got a big team and I'm sure you would have had a team of some size at that point as well. You've got the team, which can be a massive job that I think we all anticipate. We underestimate, I should say how big that job will be. You've got the finance side of things, you've got the marketing and the sales, and then you've just got general operations, you know, in terms of keeping the lights on, what do you think was the steepest learning curve for you?

Clinton:

I think the steepest learning curve for me was that the team was definitely a challenge, but the team that we have now is so good compared to what we had back in those days. So that, I mean, that part is sort of more or less, runs itself now. You know, get great people on board and it makes your job a hell of a lot easier. That's I think the steepest learning curve was the fact that I couldn't continue to do 60 to 70 patients a week doing six days and still have a passion for physiotherapy Jane. I knew that I had to step away a little bit or reduce my hours a bit in terms of treating and look at the business probably from a more objective standpoint. And yeah, along came marketing with that as well.

Jane:

Yeah. Nice. So you started, you bought into the partnership you're on this huge learning curve where you're like, holy moly did not realize that all, this was even a thing. Cause I think half like 90% of it is we don't know what we don't know. And we find out the hard way, we find out as things are kind of landing on our desks. And as you said, if you're working six days a week, just seeing patients, you know, when on earth would you be doing all your invoices and your performance reviews and your marketing and all that sort of stuff, but something that I've noticed with working with you is that you really enjoy that business side of things. Are you kind of good now that you've got a balance of both, like you get to do a bit of physio and a bit of business.

Clinton:

Yeah, absolutely. Well, what it has done, it's renewed my passion for physio, you know? I love both sides of the business, my clinical side, and also the business side equally now. And you know, I got to a point there where I was resenting going to work every day because we had the kids and I could be up all night, three or four nights in a row and then having to go to work for 12 hours a day and put on a smile and have the same conversation with people all day long. So yeah, it was certainly challenging. Yeah.

Jane:

Too much. So you plugging away, you're getting your head around the business side of things. Is it when you purchased the business outright that you started to look more deeply into the marketing side of things? Or did you have a bit of a go at marketing yourself? Like how did you kind of approach your marketing journey?

Clinton:

I did have a go myself which was not good. Cause we had been in operation since 92, 93. So we got quite a lot of word of mouth referrals and also local doctors, GPS and surgeons which is obviously hugely cost effective. But there was always a little voice in the back of my head saying, what if these referrals dry up? You know, what if people stop referring to us, which is unlikely to happen Jane, but I didn't have much control around that. And it was always a bit of a source of anxiety for me. So I wanted some level of control around attracting new clients to beach site and kind of to be a master of my own destiny, so to speak. And obviously marketing was a big part of that. In the past, I suppose I'd used a bit of a scatter gun approach. I'd either do a blog post here and there or Facebook post. And I think we even tried letterbox drop at some point. And yeah, I'll let you guess how that went.

Jane:

Well again, like all of those are correct. All of those are absolutely things that work for local businesses and work in a local area marketing plan. But I think it's the expectations of the results around a lot of those. So your letterbox drop is a perfectly valid marketing technique, but a lot of the time we do those things like a letterbox drop or an ad in the local paper. And we might just do that once a year or whatever. And we expect to see this massive, you know result of all these people, all of a sudden, you know, we've dropped 20,000 flyers. So we expect, you know, 200 people to be calling, the next week.

Clinton:

That's exactly what I expected. Yeah,

Jane:

That's right. Like you're certainly not Robinson Crusoe there. I think anyone who's just starting out with marketing has those expectations. Cause they're like, well, this takes a lot of time. It takes a lot of effort. It's cost me a lot of money. So I've got to get some sort of return immediately off the back of that. But obviously something that you're probably quite sick of me banging on about is in terms of a marketing process and putting in place a marketing ecosystem, all of which comes off the back of a marketing strategy. It's actually those multiple touch points and a consistent and persistent approach with those multiple touch points that will drive results over time. So had you kept doing those letterbox drops as well as Facebook posts, as well as blogs, the digital stuff every week or every month, and then a letterbox drop, maybe say every quarter you would have, you would've got some results. Whether it was three months down the track, six months down the track because you had this constant trait stream of touchpoints going to the right people because it takes time. As we always speak about 10 touch points, at least, or on average 10 touch points for people to actually have with your business before they can make a decision about kind of moving forward.

Jane:

And the thing obviously with physio is you only need physio when you need physio. So it's not like you can be sitting in your lounge room, check your letterbox. You're perfectly fine. A flyer comes through for physio, you're not going to just call and say, yeah, your flyer looks great. So I'm just going to book an appointment. You're not even thinking about it then, because as a customer, as a client, it's not your pain point, you know, literally you don't have a pain point. So people want to get rid of clutter or whatever. Now in the case that someone one was sitting in their living room they go to go and check the mail. They've just been to the GP because they've had a reoccurring hip problem.

And the GP said, you need to go and find a physio. Had they have gone and checked the letter box and grab that flyer out of the letterbox, they'd probably go, oh, okay. Yeah. Well, here we go. That's for sure. That's great. I might give them a call. I need to book a physio, but that's always just going to be such a small percentage of people. But as I said, you are absolutely on the right track. It's just putting the few steps before that. And understanding how consistent and persistent we need to be with that activity. And that's one of the biggest problems a lot of small business owners have is the time you've touched on that before, when you're trying to balance young family, team, all the other stuff, all the other hats that you have to wear in the business, plus then actually making the time to see the clients, marketing is often the job that falls off the radar.

So it's cyclical. We get busy, we start marketing. So then clients stop ringing, the phone stops ringing and the cycle starts again. So we start marketing, et cetera, et cetera. What I loved about what you said just then was the word of mouth referrals and yeah, well, I'm completely with you. I have no doubt. I don't think you would ever be in danger of those word of mouth of referrals ever drawing up, because as you said, you've got an awesome culture. You've got a fabulous team. You're good at what you do. It's a great business. It's stood the test of time. It's been there for years. It's a really viable business. However, I just love the fact that the way you turn that of being in charge of your own destiny, because word of mouth referrals will only get the business so far.

You're always limited to that really, really slow growth of people that already know you. And as you said, it's completely out of your control. So what happens like when everything's going really well and you've got the strong hold in the market and you're providing that awesome service and all the rest great, but what happens if a new physio or three new physios get to chronology and they're national physios that, come in with all the branding and all the marketing and all the fancy, bits and bobs, and that gets distracting for customers, you know, and there's that shiny new thing syndrome. And if they haven't seen you for a couple of years, they think, oh, this all looks new and exciting. And the marketing's really great. I'm going to go and check them out. So if you haven't got something in place to make sure that, A, you're staying front of mind and making sure that those word of mouth referrals keep coming in, but B you're actually controlling how many more people above and beyond those word of mouth referrals come in, you've got a much more viable, I guess, flow of customers coming in your direction.

Clinton:

Yeah. For sure. Jane. And that's always been a challenge with those word of mouth referrals, because, you know, Fabrice, a colleague of mine who I purchased the business of you know, he opened the business back in 92, 93. And so he's been there since the start I've been there for 10 years. So we've seen a lot of clients over the years and you know, they bring someone new on board. People are like, they know, like, and trust Fab and myself. So they sometimes they just want to see us, which is which is a challenge if we're not available, but you know, the team we've got now pretty much anyone that comes to the clinic is happy to see anyone, which is a great position to be in.

Jane:

Yeah. A hundred percent. Yep. That makes sense. So you went out and you started doing a few of your own things. You were a bit disappointed with the result, probably a little bit disillusioned with the whole marketing thing, which never works to motivate us to keep going with the marketing when we struggled to fit it in, in the first place. And then we do a little bit and spend a bit of money and it hasn’t delivered on the expectations that we have, then you're not going to be in a rush to keep going with it. So you jumped on board with the academy nine months ago. And I think he'd been doing a coaching program before that hadn't you and maybe touched on a bit of marketing.

Clinton:

Definitely. Yeah. With Nick Schuster, who's a Brisbane based physio business coach. And yeah, that's probably where my interests or my proper marketing journey started.

Jane:

Yeah. He worked your appetite a bit for that program. Yeah. Okay, cool. So then so you jumped on board with the academy and we've been working together ever since. Did you have any hesitations before kind of committing  to a program that was 12 months? So, you know, it, wasn't going to be sporadic kind of marketing here or there. Did you have any hesitations about making that commitment or I guess solidifying that investment in your marketing?

Clinton:

Yeah, absolutely. I think that be the biggest one for me Jane was probably the costs, like how much was I going to have to fork out? And was it going to cost me a fortune? You know, am I going to see results? And if I do see results, are the results going to be even meaningful? Is it going to be a patient here, a patient there? And how was I going to market? You know, what platform was I going to use? Was it going to be Google ads, Facebook, Insta, email letterbox drop, you name it, what was it going to be? But I did know I had to start and if the business is going to grow, I knew I had to put some time effort and some money into my marketing efforts.

Jane:

Yeah. And I think that's where the marketing industry can be a little bit daunting or I guess the notion of marketing can be really daunting because there isn't that kind of, and I don't know. I mean, I don't know whether it's straightforward for a lot of professions, like even in terms of HR support or even accounting support, like it can differ so greatly between. Even if I look at the accounting side of things, like there's all the bookkeeping stuff and then there's the compliance stuff, but then there's accountants who will be really proactive with your budgets and your forecasting and they give you strategic advice and you kind of don't really know what you're going to get a lot of the time until you actually start. And sometimes it can be that trial and error.

Jane:

And I know with marketing, like it's even more vast than something like accounting, like there's so much that falls under the umbrella of marketing. And at one point I actually had a colleague and I just love this idea. He said, I've got an idea for a podcast. Cause we come across it all the time. And he said, I'm going to start a podcast and it's going to be called, everyone's a marketer. And I laugh because I just thought that is the problem with the marketing industry is everyone is a marketer. So these are small businesses who are just trying to navigate, what is it that I want and need for my business. You've got all the kind of media reps calling themselves marketing representatives, although you've got like the yellow pages and the online directories, they're all your digital marketing representatives. No, they're not. Do you know what I mean? Like they work in a digital marketing field, but there's a lot of the time, particularly in those instances, their sales reps selling you a digital marketing solution. And then you've got your Facebook marketing agencies and your Google marketing agencies.

Clinton:

It's absolutely endless and confusing, totally confusing

Jane:

God as website developers all going under the umbrella of marketing, then you've got advertisers and PR people and, and a lot of them are using the language that promotes themselves in that marketing space. So no wonder small businesses owners just get so confused as well. What do I, where do I go? Like, who do I start with? You know, I just, I just need someone to work on my marketing with so I completely get how overwhelming that is, particularly when you don't know where to start. And I completely agree with you in terms of, well, you, you're not sure how much you need to invest, you're not sure what that looks like as an investment. A total investment, not sure the commitment that's going to be required of yourself. And most importantly, not sure if it's actually going to work and you'd already had some experiences where your marketing didn't work. And so you don't kind of want to repeat that. So yeah, I completely get that. What did you think it might involve? What did you think marketing might look like?

Clinton:

I suspected that it was going to involve social from the start, which it has. I wasn't quite sure which platform it was going to be on, whether it was going to be Insta or Facebook or both. But I didn't know it'd be on social just because of its enormous reach Jane. Yeah. And I think my perception of marketing was that was going to be expensive. It was going to be talking to me and it was going to be pretty boring as well.

Clinton:

That you know, I was really surprised at how inexpensive it has been to get our brand out there, particularly through Facebook ads. You know, it's been a little bit time consuming, but not hugely time consuming. Making the videos and I can probably do two or three videos in an hour, an hour and a half and that's edited and ready to go onto the platform. And it's been fun. It hasn't been boring at all. I love getting to the end of the month and the guys through my spreadsheet and putting in the numbers and looking at the results and then marrying that up with what I've seen in the clinic. I look forward to it now. So I never thought I'd say that certainly not 12 months ago anyway. Yeah.

Jane:

That's interesting. I've definitely heard again and again and again, the perception that it's going to be expensive and that it's not going to work, but I've never heard anyone say that they thought it was going to be boring. What did you think would be boring about it out of interest?

Clinton:

I don't know, but that was just the perception that I had. No, but now that I can see the results I suppose I'm more enthused about it.

Jane:

Yeah. Yeah. Oh, that's so funny. I love it. Well, I tell you what, with those perceptions and those hesitations, you did bloody well to actually move forward and start and invest in your marketing. That's awesome.

Clinton:

Thanks Jane.

Jane:

So, the first thing we do obviously is not just jumped straight into the Facebook ads and making the videos and all the rest with anything we do, whether it's with an academy client or whether it's with a client that we're actually going to be doing the marketing for them. We start with the strategic planning process, which is exactly where we started with yourself with that. Did you have, and I know it's nine months ago, I'm asking you to remember there's a lot that's happened since then, but were there any particular heart moments or realizations that kind of dropped out of that strategic planning process? And what were they?

Clinton:

Yeah, the big one for me, and I've never thought about it like this before, but it was identifying our ideal client and gaining real clarity around who that person is, was huge for us. And we had a couple, but Christine is the is the avatar that we came up with and Christine is a baby boomer and a self-funded retiree. And she has two to three grandkids that she looks after two to three days a week. She loves keeping active and having coffee with friends, walking on the Esplanade down here Cronulla and now she finds herself busier than ever because she's now looking after elderly parents, as well as the grandkids. She's unfortunately had a history of back pain and also a little bit of knee pain and she'll do anything to keep her body moving.

Clinton:

The greatest fear Jane is that an injury is going to prevent her from caring for a family. So that's Christine. So yeah. And then after defining the avatar, we just worked out how we were going to get in front of that person. And that was through Facebook videos where the boomers tend to spend a lot of their time on that platform. So that was logical for us. And I think the other aha moment was your education around how we were actually going to track the marketing efforts? Because previously I just had no idea how we were going to track that and Google ads and Facebook ads make it so easy to track these numbers. And that really sat well with me because I didn't want to spend this money and go, okay, so  how do I know that that's worked? Yeah so it's great to see how it's evolved and yeah.

Jane:

I love that. I think that understanding your target is probably an aha moment, or it's a moment of clarity for so many business owners because we can service a whole bunch of people in the community or within the segments, technically there's a whole bunch of different people that we can provide our services to. But that process of kind of segmenting the market and going, okay, we can provide, this is where our, this is where our services are kind of most relevant. These are the people that we can really help. Now let's work out which groups of those we would actually like to go and target. And originally we had two segments down for you. Cause we kind of looked at a few different segments originally, and we had the Christine's and we also had tradies as a potential. Trent the tradie., I love how you've got all the details at the ready.

Trent wasn’t too engaged. He was a little bit lazy, probably at the pub. And Trent doesn't engage on social media. Got to say. So big Trent might not even be on social media and even if he is, he's flicking through, and he's certainly not going to be liking anything or commenting on anything. So it's a bit hard to really kind of gauge where the Trent’s are seeing and interacting with our content. But we did, we kind of went, okay, these are the two segments within the Cronulla Shire within the community. These are the two segments and we designed communication strategies for both. Okay. So if we're talking to Trent, he's a tradie and so here's the kind of injuries that Trent might be experiencing.

So here's the kind of communication and the messages that will get to Trent. Have we kind of looked at his journey on coming on board? And would it be his girlfriend that might have something to do with influencing you to come along? What are the risks? Because you know, like whereas Christine was more worried about if she can't move, she can't help her son or daughter look after the kids and she can't help her elderly parents. So it's really important that she moves them, plus she's really social. So she doesn't want to miss those walks along the Esplanade with all her friends, because that's exactly where she finds out what happens each week with all the goss. So that's her motivation. Whereas Trent, if he's back goes out or if he's shoulder's out and he can't work, that's a financial problem.

Like that's a huge part. Or if he can't go to the gym and work out and he starts getting flabby. And so socially, he's not feeling that he looks good. You know, that's a problem. So two really different problems and aspirations there to address. So we experimented with both and as you noticed, and I love that you love the measurements because so do I, but you noticed, and you diligently checked to see who was responding with the Facebook posts. And I think Christine and all her friends and we call her Christine, but it obviously wasn't really Christine, Christine esque people, they were loving it. How would you describe their reaction to some of your Facebook content?

Clinton:

Yeah, they were just happy to comment and thank me for the advice. Cause that's what they are. They're just educational pieces. And when they come into the clinic,  they often make comment about the video. You know, I did this exercise that really helped and blah, blah, blah. So it's been really positive. Yeah.

Jane:

Yeah. You had a Facebook page at this stage. So would you say it was people that were already kind of in your community? Did you get a few new people coming in via these videos? Was it a mixture of both? What would you say it was?

Clinton:

Yeah, it was definitely a mixture of both. Certainly, you know, we've always had people that would comment on our posts within our community. But yeah, we certainly had just received so many likes and then I invited the Matt to like the page and then they started engaging. So it was just kind of snowballing Jane.

Jane:

Yeah. Isn't that awesome. And just for the context for everybody listening, so there was a few things that we did, it wasn't just Facebook ads, but a big part of the campaigning for Clinton's marketing was putting together videos. And we had Trent and Christine in mind, but the videos for Christine won out in the end and they were literally like two, three minute videos where Clinton would say, have you got a pain in the hip or a pain in the knee or if you're feeling this here's some exercises that you can do or here's some stretches that you can do that might be able to alleviate that, and if the pain persists come and, come and see us. It's essentially two to three minute videos now they were going on his Facebook page, but we were also placing these ads through the ad system so that they had much more longevity and much more of a chance to actually get seen by new people.

And we could control the volume of that. So we could control how many people like we want. There there's no point in getting Clinton's ads advertised in Western Australia or Victoria. Like this is a very much a local area marketing plan. So we needed to make sure that those ads, you know, were seen by enough people, enough times within the right area. And we knew the kind of age group and the description of the people that we wanted to target. So it was so awesome when we're able to kind of see people getting to know that content, to like Clinton and what he was kind of talking about. And then trust him enough to actually pick up the phone and come in and say it, which was so good. Okay. So, we've spoken about what some of that activity was, which was mostly the activity that we've been doing. And we've kind of just been tweaking that along the way. You have had a few challenges though, along the way, with this marketing approach. What have some of those challenges being?

Clinton:

I think the main challenge was breaking the ice in front of the camera, Jane. I've done a little bit in front of the camera before, but when I saw the plan that you had implemented and I saw that it's going to involve lots of camera work. It was scary. It was daunting at first, but I'm naturally an introvert. So yeah, it was scary to think that I'm going to be in front of thousands of people on Facebook, but literally after doing that first video or two, you know, that barrier was totally broken down. So the other one was probably being consistent with the marketing, as you alluded to earlier on. I think we've had a chat before, but around that Christmas new year's period was really tough. My kids are all born late in the year, two in December and one in November.

So it's birthday, birthday, birthday, Christmas. And so being prepared for that time of year, I think going forward, it's going to be massive. I didn't pump out much marketing material during that period just because it was so busy. And then we float over into January and that just happened to be a record month for us or record for January for us. So it's yeah, I'm back on the horse now which is good, but content thinking of content all the time, Jane what we found is that we, we get questions on a daily basis within the clinic and they sort of format form the basis of, of the videos that we that we do. So, and then we had the challenges around the Facebook artificial intelligence, which was so frustrating. So basically when I was submitting an ad for review, the ads were being rejected because of what Facebook calls I think it's called personal attributes where if you put personal attributes, say foot or shoulder, or even paying within the text of the ad Facebook Artificial Intelligence picks that up and rejects the ad.

So that means I have to go back into how I created the ad and change the wording and blah, blah, blah, which I got around in the end. But it was definitely really frustrating. But we had smarted at Facebook in the end so.

Jane:

And if you're listening Facebook, we're not doing anything wrong. It was your artificial intelligence. That was picking it up in the wrong context. Yes, and that is so frustrating. And unfortunately it's just one of those glitches that we come across in Facebook and unfortunately there's really nothing that we can do about it. And sometimes when Facebook introduce a new feature or when they turn up the volume on that artificial intelligence, in terms of taking away more responsibility from human brains and putting it more towards that artificial intelligence, you get this overdrive of incorrect, basically activity and assumptions. And Facebook have always been this kind of faceless, ironically, organization where there's no help support. You know, it's like Google, unless it's for specific invest, you know, paid for products, there is no support.

There's no help line there's no one. And even if you are spending money with them, you have got be kind of spending big bucks to get a Facebook account manager and it can be really frustrating. And all you can do is exactly what you did and just experiment, tweak, and then you eventually get to see where the little flags are. And then when you're developing your content, you can just be aware of those and make sure that you try not to tweak the red flag there. So you did exactly the right thing. And I think really because yeah, again for the personal attributes, because you do have those personal attributes the physio stuff seems to be a little bit more sensitive than say a bread shop or whatever. So you did so well to persist there. And as well I don't think I ever knew that you were hesitant to get in front of the camera. I think you just pretty much just went for it.

You did very well to hide that because you were like straight onto it. And I think, you know, within a week or so of having that marketing plan put together, you produced your three videos. They were up on Facebook. You were rolling. That was awesome. You like a checklist, Clinton.                                                                                                                                                                            

And the consistency and the persistency is 100%. And that's where sometimes this is a problem that I have all the time in my business as well is making sure that my marketing is persistent and consistent and all we can do is do our very best knowing that marketing will only work if we are consistent and persistent, but hey, if we have a month where we just don't get to it for whatever reason, don't just throw the baby out with the bath water, you know, just accept that. Okay. That was that month, this month different we'll do things differently. We'll be, you know, re-prioritize, I think too, because you love that measurement process and the fact that you actually get to see those measurements each month would help you. Is that right?

Clinton:

Yeah. I get excited. I'll say, look, I'm a bit of a marketing nerd now, but I get excited when I feel in that spreadsheet. Cause I can see the results. I can see the results there objectively in the spreadsheet. And then I marry that up with the other numbers that I track through the business. And so you can see the results. It's good. Yeah.

Jane:

Yeah. And again, for context for everyone. So the spreadsheets and they're really rudimentary at some stage, I'll get a flash dashboard for all of this measuring, but the spreadsheets, we're not just tracking, how many leads and sales that we get each month or how many appointments, we do have all of that information in there, but we're also tracking, how many people are actually seeing our content because we knew we wanted to get Clinton's brand in front of a whole bunch of people that didn't know already about beach side. So we wanted to extend it beyond the people who would already be giving us that word of mouth referral. So that meant we had to get the content in front of a whole lot more new people. So we measured how many people will get it.

We were getting the content in front of each month. How many people are then engaging with that content? And then of course, you know, how many people end up booking appointments? And of course it's not linear. So just like in August, if you get a whole bunch of people seeing your content, we don't necessarily see the appointments jump up for August. It might be, if we have three months of consistent high rates and engagement, in the fourth month we might actually start to see more leads and phone calls and clients. And where would you kind of measure new clients versus existing clients and how many appointments per patient, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. So there's lots of different measurement points that we're tracking. And you're so diligent at it, which is awesome because I get excited about seeing it. So what do you think are some of the benefits that you've experienced from this really boring, expensive investment that you didn't think would necessarily drive any return?

Clinton:

Yeah. Well, the benefits have been huge, far beyond what I'd expected. Jane, I'm happy to admit. I saw it from learning a new skill, that businesses see quite a significant increase in new patient numbers. We're now averaging 190 appointments a week as opposed to 150, just a year ago. Local community are becoming more educated about their injuries. And like, as I mentioned before, you know, we've received so many positive comments around the videos and it's always good for a little bit of banjo within the clinic. And the revenue is up 30% on this time last year. And so obviously there's other factors that play there, Jane the big one being the great team that we've got at the moment, but you know, marketing has certainly played a significant role in that revenue increase for sure.

Jane:

God, that's so awesome. Actually, there is one more thing that you've been doing as well is you had quite a significant email database of ex patients and existing patients and you've been emailing them once or twice once every one or two months as well. And again you had some beautiful examples of where you were using storytelling and storytelling in those emails to actually engage people around, you know, such and such was experiencing this, this, this as a result of this, this, this, and we saw them for this, this and this, and they started doing this and then here's the outcome, but you put some beautiful stories and context around those as well, which was great. And I know emails haven't been as persistent and consistent as you would like, but you definitely had them on the schedule.

And once the kind of Facebooks are all done and dusted, you might have that little bit more time to be able to spend with the emails as well. Cause obviously these are the people that you do stand to get that word of mouth referral to, but as you're getting more and more new patients in you're expanding that network and that reach and emails just serve as a beautiful way to keep front of mind and keep the relationship going with people who once they have one injury fixed, you might not see them for another three or four years. So it's a perfect excuse to kind of keep in touch in a valuable way.

So the key marketing measurements that, you've been keeping, I mean, obviously there's the, and thank you for being so generous in terms of sharing your leads and revenue and the increase on those. Were there any particular marketing measurements that you kind of really learned about the power of marketing from, or was it kind of all of them mixed together and I guess seeing them all together and the effect of how they all kind of relate to one another, or were there particular measurements that you were able to learn from?

Clinton:

I was already tracking a lot of the numbers within the business as well, but in terms of the marketing, I think that the most powerful thing that I noticed in since starting work with you, Jane, is that I can spend a hundred dollars on a Facebook ad and get our business in front of 8,000 people within a 2 kilometre radius of my clinic. And these people have the exact same demographics as Christine, our ideal client. So that was my biggest learning. And that's what I took out of. That's the number one, I think. Yeah.

Jane:

Yeah, that's right. So the potency, of where that lands, and that's the brilliant thing about digital marketing is that you can track that.

Clinton:

Yep. That was really powerful. And for me that was nervous about spending money on marketing. I didn't even know there were 8,000 Christine's within the case of my clinic. So now I do.

Jane:

There are potential markets, because again, we can assume that the majority of people are on Facebook now for Christine, who I think is she aged between 50, 55.

Clinton:

And 55 and above, yeah.

Jane:

It might not be a hundred percent strike rate of Christine's on Facebook, but, you know, it would be, you know, very close. Absolutely. So if you had to give some advice to another small business owner who was sitting on the fence about investing in marketing, what specific, apart from you should do it's really not that boring. What specific advice do you think you'd offer to them about marketing and about their journey?

Clinton:

Yeah, I think get started straight away, because the sooner they start, the sooner they are going to see the benefits and it's all about getting momentum. Starting is always going to be the hardest part. And I think everyone's going to have their own fears and barriers around their marketing and that's perfectly natural and they should have some level of peace with that, but and also get expert advice because it's it just the whole process Jane to have you there with providing a plan direction hold me accountable. I'm a person that needs to be held accountable and the measuring, which we've covered has been awesome. And it just shows you that you're not going to be throwing money away at marketing that isn't going to have any return. Yeah.

Jane:

Yeah. A hundred percent. I think that would be awesome advice. And if anyone, and especially if you are sitting in the Southern shires, listening to this in Cronulla within a two kilometer radius from Beach Side physio and look a bit like Christine sounds if our listeners would like to come and see some of that wonderful marketing that you're doing, or find out a little bit more about beach side physio or yourself, where can they find you one?

Clinton:

Yeah. They can go to our Facebook page @thebeachsidephysioandsportsclinic to if I want to see those videos or they can, if they want to know more about us as a business, they can go to our website, which is, beachsidephysio.com.au, or if they want to email me personally, it's my full name, which is [email protected]

Jane:

Brilliant. I love it. Thank you so much for sharing your marketing journey with me. That's awesome. And all of our listeners, I think there's so there's so much that that people will be able to take away from that because I think it's such a familiar journey that you have so beautifully managed to take and overcome all of the hurdles. So well done Clinton, and thank you so much for today.

Clinton:

Thanks, Jane. Thanks so much for having me and all your help. Appreciate it.